Dare to Dream

Dare to Dream (by me)

So I have this theory, when I dream I feel no physical pain, if its a good dream I will wake up happy and wish I could go back and continue the dream. Is dreaming like death or Nirvana or is it just a chance for our brain to reboot. This is an interesting proposition because if we can enter a dream state without the constant worries and pressures of the “real”world then isn’t that a better way to exist?

We will never really know what makes us dream maybe one day someone will be able to explain.

Wikipedia says “A dream is a succession of imagesideasemotions, and sensations that usually occur involuntarily in the mind during certain stages of sleep.[1] The content and purpose of dreams are not fully understood, although they have been a topic of scientific, philosophical and religious interest throughout recorded historyDream interpretation is the attempt at drawing meaning from dreams and searching for an underlying message. The scientific study of dreams is called oneirology.[2]

Dreams mainly occur in the rapid-eye movement (REM) stage of sleep—when brain activity is high and resembles that of being awake. REM sleep is revealed by continuous movements of the eyes during sleep. At times, dreams may occur during other stages of sleep. However, these dreams tend to be much less vivid or memorable.[3] The length of a dream can vary; they may last for a few seconds, or approximately 20–30 minutes.[3] People are more likely to remember the dream if they are awakened during the REM phase. The average person has three to five dreams per night, and some may have up to seven;[4] however, most dreams are immediately or quickly forgotten.[5] Dreams tend to last longer as the night progresses. During a full eight-hour night sleep, most dreams occur in the typical two hours of REM.[6] Dreams related to waking-life experiences are associated with REM theta activity, which suggests that emotional memory processing takes place in REM sleep.[7]

Opinions about the meaning of dreams have varied and shifted through time and culture. Many endorse the Freudian theory of dreams – that dreams reveal insight into hidden desires and emotions.[qualify evidence] Other prominent theories include those suggesting that dreams assist in memory formation, problem solving, or simply are a product of random brain activation.[8]

Sigmund Freud, who developed the psychological discipline of psychoanalysis, wrote extensively about dream theories and their interpretations in the early 1900s.[9] He explained dreams as manifestations of one’s deepest desires and anxieties, often relating to repressed childhood memories or obsessions. Furthermore, he believed that virtually every dream topic, regardless of its content, represented the release of sexual tension.[10] In The Interpretation of Dreams (1899), Freud developed a psychological technique to interpret dreams and devised a series of guidelines to understand the symbols and motifs that appear in our dreams. In modern times, dreams have been seen as a connection to the unconscious mind. They range from normal and ordinary to overly surreal and bizarre. Dreams can have varying natures, such as being frightening, exciting, magicalmelancholic, adventurous, or sexual. The events in dreams are generally outside the control of the dreamer, with the exception of lucid dreaming, where the dreamer is self-aware.[11] Dreams can at times make a creative thought occur to the person or give a sense of inspiration.[12]

Ancient history

The Dreaming is a common term within the animist creation narrative of indigenous Australians for a personal, or group, creation and for what may be understood as the “timeless time” of formative creation and perpetual creating.[13]

The ancient Sumerians in Mesopotamia have left evidence of dream interpretation dating back to at least 3100 BC.[14][15] Throughout Mesopotamian history, dreams were always held to be extremely important for divination[15][16] and Mesopotamian kings paid close attention to them.[15][14] Gudea, the king of the Sumerian city-state of Lagash (reigned c. 2144–2124 BC), rebuilt the temple of Ningirsu as the result of a dream in which he was told to do so.[15] The standard Akkadian Epic of Gilgamesh contains numerous accounts of the prophetic power of dreams.[15] First, Gilgamesh himself has two dreams foretelling the arrival of Enkidu.[15] Later, Enkidu dreams about the heroes’ encounter with the giant Humbaba.[15] Dreams were also sometimes seen as a means of seeing into other worlds[15] and it was thought that the soul, or some part of it, moved out of the body of the sleeping person and actually visited the places and persons the dreamer saw in his or her sleep.[17] In Tablet VII of the epic, Enkidu recounts to Gilgamesh a dream in which he saw the gods AnuEnlil, and Shamash condemn him to death.[15] He also has a dream in which he visits the Underworld.[15]

The Assyrian king Ashurnasirpal II (reigned 883–859 BC) built a temple to Mamu, possibly the god of dreams, at Imgur-Enlil, near Kalhu.[15] The later Assyrian king Ashurbanipal (reigned 668–c. 627 BC) had a dream during a desperate military situation in which his divine patron, the goddess Ishtar, appeared to him and promised that she would lead him to victory.[15] The Babylonians and Assyrians divided dreams into “good,” which were sent by the gods, and “bad,” sent by demons.[16] A surviving collection of dream omens entitled Iškar Zaqīqu records various dream scenarios as well as prognostications of what will happen to the person who experiences each dream, apparently based on previous cases.[15][18] Some list different possible outcomes, based on occasions in which people experienced similar dreams with different results.[15] Dream scenarios mentioned include a variety of daily work events, journeys to different locations, family matters, sex acts, and encounters with human individuals, animals, and deities.[15]

In ancient Egypt, as far back as 2000 BC, the Egyptians wrote down their dreams on papyrus. People with vivid and significant dreams were thought to be blessed and were considered special.[19] Ancient Egyptians believed that dreams were like oracles, bringing messages from the gods. They thought that the best way to receive divine revelation was through dreaming and thus they would induce (or “incubate”) dreams. Egyptians would go to sanctuaries and sleep on special “dream beds” in hope of receiving advice, comfort, or healing from the gods.[20]

Classical history

Dreaming of the Tiger Spring (虎跑夢泉)

In Chinese history, people wrote of two vital aspects of the soul of which one is freed from the body during slumber to journey in a dream realm, while the other remained in the body,[21] although this belief and dream interpretation had been questioned since early times, such as by the philosopher Wang Chong (27–97 AD).[21] The Indian text Upanishads, written between 900 and 500 BC, emphasizes two meanings of dreams. The first says that dreams are merely expressions of inner desires. The second is the belief of the soul leaving the body and being guided until awakened.

The Greeks shared their beliefs with the Egyptians on how to interpret good and bad dreams, and the idea of incubating dreams. Morpheus, the Greek god of dreams, also sent warnings and prophecies to those who slept at shrines and temples. The earliest Greek beliefs about dreams were that their gods physically visited the dreamers, where they entered through a keyhole, exiting the same way after the divine message was given.

Antiphon wrote the first known Greek book on dreams in the 5th century BC. In that century, other cultures influenced Greeks to develop the belief that souls left the sleeping body.[22] Hippocrates (469–399 BC) had a simple dream theory: during the day, the soul receives images; during the night, it produces images. Greek philosopher Aristotle (384–322 BC) believed dreams caused physiological activity. He thought dreams could analyze illness and predict diseases. Marcus Tullius Cicero, for his part, believed that all dreams are produced by thoughts and conversations a dreamer had during the preceding days.[23] Cicero’s Somnium Scipionis described a lengthy dream vision, which in turn was commented on by Macrobius in his Commentarii in Somnium Scipionis.

Herodotus in his The Histories, writes “The visions that occur to us in dreams are, more often than not, the things we have been concerned about during the day.”[24]Beginning of “The Dream of Macsen Wledig” from the White Book of Rhydderch, f.45.r

In Welsh history, The Dream of Rhonabwy (Welsh: Breuddwyd Rhonabwy) is a Middle Welsh prose tale. Set during the reign of Madog ap Maredudd, prince of Powys (died 1160), it is dated to the late 12th or 13th century. It survives in only one manuscript, the Red Book of Hergest, and has been associated with the Mabinogion since its publication by Lady Charlotte Guest in the 19th century. The bulk of the narrative describes a dream vision experienced by its central character, Rhonabwy, a retainer of Madog, in which he visits the time of King Arthur.[25]

Also in Welsh history, the tale ‘The Dream of Macsen Wledig’ is a romanticised story about the Roman emperor Magnus Maximus, called Macsen Wledig in Welsh. Born in Hispania, he became a legionary commander in Britain, assembled a Celtic army and assumed the title of Emperor of the Western Roman Empire in 383. He was defeated in battle in 385 and beheaded at the direction of the Eastern Roman emperor.[26]

Religious views

In Abrahamic religions

Jacob’s dream of a ladder of angels, c. 1690, by Michael Willmann

In Judaism, dreams are considered part of the experience of the world that can be interpreted and from which lessons can be garnered. It is discussed in the Talmud, Tractate Berachot 55–60.

The ancient Hebrews connected their dreams heavily with their religion, though the Hebrews were monotheistic and believed that dreams were the voice of one God alone. Hebrews also differentiated between good dreams (from God) and bad dreams (from evil spirits). The Hebrews, like many other ancient cultures, incubated dreams in order to receive a divine revelation. For example, the Hebrew prophet Samuel would “lie down and sleep in the temple at Shiloh before the Ark and receive the word of the Lord.” Most of the dreams in the Bible are in the Book of Genesis.[27]

Christians mostly shared the beliefs of the Hebrews and thought that dreams were of a supernatural character because the Old Testament includes frequent stories of dreams with divine inspiration. The most famous of these dream stories was Jacob’s dream of a ladder that stretches from Earth to Heaven. Many Christians preach that God can speak to people through their dreams. The famous glossary, the Somniale Danielis, written in the name of Daniel, attempted to teach Christian populations to interpret their dreams.

Iain R. Edgar has researched the role of dreams in Islam.[28] He has argued that dreams play an important role in the history of Islam and the lives of Muslims, since dream interpretation is the only way that Muslims can receive revelations from God since the death of the last prophet, Muhammad.[29]

In Hinduism

In the Mandukya Upanishad, part of the Veda scriptures of Indian Hinduism, a dream is one of three states that the soul experiences during its lifetime, the other two states being the waking state and the sleep state.[30]

In Buddhism

In Buddhism, ideas about dreams are similar to the classical and folk traditions in South Asia. The same dream is sometimes experienced by multiple people, as in the case of the Buddha-to-be, before he is leaving his home. It is described in the Mahāvastu that several of the Buddha’s relatives had premonitory dreams preceding this. Some dreams are also seen to transcend time: the Buddha-to-be has certain dreams that are the same as those of previous Buddhas, the Lalitavistara states. In Buddhist literature, dreams often function as a “signpost” motif to mark certain stages in the life of the main character.[31]

Buddhist views about dreams are expressed in the Pāli Commentaries and the Milinda Pañhā.[31]

Dreams and philosophical realism

Main article: Dream argumentA Dream of a Girl Before a Sunrise by Karl Bryullov (1830–1833)

Some philosophers have concluded that what we think of as the “real world” could be or is an illusion (an idea known as the skeptical hypothesis about ontology).

The first recorded mention of the idea was by Zhuangzi, and it is also discussed in Hinduism, which makes extensive use of the argument in its writings.[32] It was formally introduced to Western philosophy by Descartes in the 17th century in his Meditations on First Philosophy. Stimulus, usually an auditory one, becomes a part of a dream, eventually then awakening the dreamer.

Postclassical and medieval history

Some Indigenous American tribes and Mexican civilizations believe that dreams are a way of visiting and having contact with their ancestors.[33] Some Native American tribes used vision quests as a rite of passage, fasting and praying until an anticipated guiding dream was received, to be shared with the rest of the tribe upon their return.[34][35]

The Middle Ages brought a harsh interpretation of dreams.[citation needed] They were seen as evil, and the images as temptations from the devil. Many believed that during sleep, the devil could fill the human mind with corrupting and harmful thoughts. Martin Luther, the Protestant Reformer, believed dreams were the work of the Devil. However, Catholics such as St. Augustine and St. Jerome claimed that the direction of their lives was heavily influenced by their dreams. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dream

Well that’s some theory we shall see

I HAD A DREAM

As the great MLK said Martin Luther King had a dream and I’ve had many dreams lately, its almost like some Divine light is guiding me and won’t allow me to sleep. Now I ain’t afraid of death, I’m a Buddhist I believe in reincarnation so one way or another I’ll be back when I come back I want to come back as a tree, IF I get to choose. I’m posting this quickly now just in case well you never know what’s gonna happen next but when I come back to this post to finish I’ll describe my dream which involves black friends the government conspiracy etc etc.

SO here I am again to continue. In my dream yes I dare to dream, I was in America working for these guy’s it was a conspiracy of HUGE proportions. It’s very complex so bear with me. My Guru Prabu Darma Yasa was in the dream along with a friend Lydia. I was in the USA being kept under guard while I worked for these guys who were employed in a secret organisation aimed at keeping the truth a secret and the truth when I saw it in my dream was of global proportions. Now I was being kept in the open which is the best place to keep things out right in front of ya. I was working alongside a black man and his mother cleaning and stuff. They didn’t know about their ancestor how they came to be in the USA so I explained I’d lived in Hull the centre of the half way stage for the slave trade about the museum which showed in graphic details how thier ancestors had been shipped from place in Africa like the Congo or Niger (river) or today’s Nigeria (that’s where the name Niger came from)

I will continue until it’s finished but here’s where I am so far..

This secret government organisation which even the President didn’t know about had been going since the start of the slave trade. It was funded. Well my dream never told me that, but I would imagine some white supremacy group bent on keeping the black man down. Now I have many black friends one saved my life Rodney Brown another worked with me she was called Ell Michele well her real name was Latrice Ross. The dream featured Lydia and Melody in Lydia’s case I was her ex BUSINESS partner, in Melody’s case her ex-husband. I wish them both well.

I realised for the first time how the black people in America were being supressed in one way or another. I’m a retired volunteer cop and I saw first-hand how even the cops picked on blacks. One day for example we stopped a poor black man for straying over his lane in his car on the highway he showed his wallet inside was a picture of his dead wife. He was taken to prison that’s the last I ever saw of him. I decided rather quickly to leave as a volunteer cop was allowed to keep my ID and later left America (supposedly Land of the Free).

You may think these are the ramblings of an old crazy brit but be assured I’m just an instrument in getting the word out there I don’t know who’s guiding my hand but the bugger is keeping me awake night after night and I beg for some sleep. Rodney saved my life on a lake in Texas I was drowning and being an ex-footballer he threw me a line. I had many black friends I met Stedman Graham a US football legend, big guy I had my photo taken with him when he visited my ex-wife’s school Winfree Academy.